Garden Planning

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If you live in the North East, it’s that time of year to begin planning out your garden.  Unless, like me, you have been planning since December.   That is when the John Scheeper’s and Burpee’s catalogues start to arrive in the post.  This is not to say that I have a plan.  I don’t   It’s just a plan in process.  The plan won’t actually be finished until about November, when I pull everything up.  Then I get a month of respite before I start my seeds for next year.

How you plan your garden says volumes about who you are as a person.  Here is an example.  I started 12 kinds of peppers in my bathtub this January.  I carefully marked each container so I could tell the difference between the Aji Jamaica and the Aji Major after they came up.  I watered them and kept the lights on them religiously, never really noticing that my painstakingly crafted markers were disintegrating in the constant moisture.   Truthfully, I kind of knew what was happening, but forgot to do anything about it as soon as I left the bathroom.  Some might say that that’s just lazy, and they’d be partly right, but the fact is I secretly don’t care that I can’t identify them anymore.  Now it’s a big mystery what might evolve from my luscious leafy pepper bushes, and I’m delighted to watch it unfold as the peppers bloom and grow.  That’s just who I am.  I try to be orderly, but the mystery and randomness of life pleases me too much to try very hard.  I would tell you that a garden is a microcosm of the larger world, and in that I’d be right.  I would tell you that the mystery and randomness one finds while gardening is how the world operates, but as it turns out, that’s just true for me.

Here is how I know.  Some years ago I helped some very wonderful people to start their vegetable garden.  They had bought a house with an existing garden that still held the remnants of summer, and they were inspired to plant again the following year.  The challenge was that the garden was hideously overgrown and they had never gardened vegetables before.  It was an interesting exercise for me in more ways than one.  I took it on as a personal challenge and began to plan…my way.   What I found over time was that my way was not necessarily their way, and in the end I admiringly backed out of having much of a hand in their garden.  My way leaves much to the whims of nature and admits that nothing is truly within my control.  For them, it was just a bit unstructured and random.  They wanted a more orderly and precise garden.  Well planned, I should say.  They chose vegetable types and locations in advance of whimsy and availability.  They chose to plant in marked rows that had been laid out in advance.  It was all slightly shocking to me.  In the end I admit that I learned quite a bit from their gardening practices, and continue to consider myself divinely fortunate to know them. 

Some people crave order.  Some people thrive on chaos.  I may be little of both.  I tell myself it is the sign of a flexible mind.  Which kind are you?  

Cilantro Sea Scallops

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Scallops are a treasure from the sea, but due to over harvesting, were in declining populations until recently.  Federal regulations that started going into effect in the late 1990s have helped scallops make a huge comeback.  But inshore there are still far fewer sea scallops than there used to be, and so farmed sea scallops are now being harvested in the Northeastern Atlantic and Pacific.   Seafood watchdog groups list them as a good choice for people who eat seafood, as they can be harvested without damage to habitat and have low levels of mercury.  When you purchase scallops, ask your grocer where they came from, as some farmed scallops are imported from Japan!

Here is a super easy recipe for cooking sea scallops that is as healthful as it is delicious.  It should be served with Black rice, which takes longer to cook than white or brown, but is worth the wait, as it is more flavorful and better for you then either of the others.  Lundberg makes a Black Japonica rice that is an heirloom variety, which means it has not been genetically altered.  It is grown in an eco-friendly manner that conserves water, maintains soil integrity and supports a healthy ecosystem.

Cilantro Sea Scallops

3 Tbs Butter

1.5 lbs Fresh Sea Scallops

3 Tbs White wine

3 Tbs fresh chopped cilantro

Sprinkle of salt

Lemon wedges

Brown the butter over high heat in a large saute pan. Add the scallops and allow to brown,  don’t move them around.  When they are cooked about halfway through, maybe 3-4 minutes, flip them over and brown the other side.  After 3 more minutes add the white wine, de-glazing the pan.  Add the cilantro and the salt and toss to coat.  Serve these delectable morsels with black rice and wedges of lemon.

Enjoy!